WHAT IS COMPOSTING?

Composting is a process of breaking down organic waste to produce a nutrient-rich soil.

WHY SHOULD YOU DO IT?

Composting benefits the environment in many ways. Check out some of them below:

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LANDFILL DIVERSION

When organic waste breaks down in a landfill it releases methane into the atmosphere. The impact of methane on our environment is 25 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. Landfills are the third-largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States. Because composting adds oxygen into the decomposition process, methane emissions are significantly reduced or eliminated entirely!

SOIL COMPOSITION

Adding compost to soil allows it to better retain water, nutrients, and air. This reduces runoff and erosion and creates an optimal environment for plants. According to the EPA, adding just 1% more organic matter to soil can increase its water holding capacity.

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NATURAL ALTERNATIVE

Compost acts as a natural pesticide and fertilizer for plants. The healthy bacteria and critters found in compost help fight off harmful pests and diseases. Compost also contains a greater variety of nutrients than fertilizers and slowly releases them over time. Compost both adds nutrients to soil and enables it to retain them more effectively.

BREAKDOWN

Composting is an aerobic method (meaning it requires the presence of oxygen) of decomposing organic solid wastes using microorganisms such as bacteria and worms.

OUTCOME

The compost is turned to introduce water and oxygen and speed up the overall process. Once the organic material is broken down, the final product, a nutrient-rich soil conditioner, is created.

USE

The compost is used in gardens, urban agriculture, organic farming, and more. It fertilizes plants, acts as a natural pesticide, amends poor soil and aids in water retention.

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